AardvarkBusiness.net - Business Search Engine AardvarkBusiness.net - Business Search Engine



 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

     

The psychology of selling

 
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    AardvarkBusiness.net Forum Index -> Sales & Marketing Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Kay
President
President


Joined: 07 Jan 2009
Posts: 3079
Location: Mostly SE Asia
4173 ants

PostPosted: Thu Jul 07, 2011 9:17 am    Post subject: The psychology of selling Reply with quote

I'm always saying that I'm no good at sales. Maybe it doesn't matter.

Yesterday I contacted three businesses (on behalf of someone else's site), two by email and one by a contact form that didn't seem to work properly. And, yes, this was cold calling - they've never heard of me before and have no idea about who I am or what I'm offering.

The result? 100% success with the emails. Shocked They're interested.

I'm completely amazed by this. I'd expected no response or maybe a polite rejection, or maybe even abuse for being so cheeky. But I've managed to get their interest.

How did I do it?

I simply introduced myself and said what I could do for them.

Not by any sales hype (I'm not good at selling, remember). It was a simple case of researching the market, finding recipients who were perfect for the pitch, and writing personal emails to them. I'd have liked to address the people by name but the info wasn't available so I had to resort to "Dear Sir or Madam".

Maybe this is beginner's luck (the first time I've been let loose on that particular job). Maybe it's because I'm just an honest person and write without any sales hype. Or maybe it's something else.

I can tell you that it's pretty exciting to get the positive responses.

My advice FWIW (coz I can't do sales) is:

- don't ram your offering down people's throats
- don't use sales hype
- just be honest and clearly state what you're asking of people and what you're offering them
- don't preach at people or patronise them (remember all these spams telling you how link swaps would be beneficial to you?)
- just behave as a person not some kind of sales robot

Aye well, pride before a fall and all that. Meanwhile I'm on a high because it doesn't seem to matter that I can't do sales.

Are there any members here who can sell? What do you have to say about it?
_________________
http://britishexpat.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
paul
President
President


Joined: 15 Oct 2002
Posts: 8314
Location: UK
11706 ants

PostPosted: Thu Jul 07, 2011 4:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wouldn't claim to be good at selling either, but for me you've pretty much hit the nail on the head.

For me, people don't want to hear that you're the best at what you do (not from you, at least)... they just want the facts presented politely and clearly. They want you to contact them if it's relevant, if you have something to offer that's likely to spark their interest, and if there's potentially something in it for them. They're not looking to be preached to, or for a sales pitch, or for you to be cocky/arrogant/boastful/whatever... I'm generalising, of course, but strangely it seems that many "sales people" are these things and more.
_________________
UK Hotels - UK Selfcatering
Luxury Travel - Lake District Apartment
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Kay
President
President


Joined: 07 Jan 2009
Posts: 3079
Location: Mostly SE Asia
4173 ants

PostPosted: Thu Jul 07, 2011 4:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wonder why Lord Sugar puts so much emphasis on sales skills when he's looking for an "apprentice".

Funnily enough, despite not being a sales person, if you put me behind a stall at a car boot sale or similar, I can get right into the mode and sell, sell, sell. When I say that I can't sell I mean in a business environment.

What the heck is the difference? Is it a matter of confidence? Maybe a different approach is needed?

I hope someone who has sales in their skill set will comment.
_________________
http://britishexpat.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Dave McM
Executive PA
Executive PA


Joined: 18 Feb 2010
Posts: 52
Location: Usually SE Asia
59 ants

PostPosted: Thu Jul 07, 2011 7:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

To be honest, I was surprised (very pleasantly, of course) at both the speed of response and the outcomes. But I think Paul's quite right - and I think that Kay's approach met that overall description.

I'm sure that in a face-to-face situation there's much more opportunity for "the psychology of the individual" ( Jeeves) to come into play. But there's far less scope for that via email, so far better to play it straight.
_________________
British Newspapers Online - All about the UK's national, regional and local press
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
scottlinken
PA
PA


Joined: 13 Jul 2011
Posts: 22
Location: Cheshire, UK
27 ants

PostPosted: Wed Jul 13, 2011 3:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
It was a simple case of researching the market,


I think a large part of the sale is in "teeing it up"

If you know your customers and the market and the product inside and out (mainly the customers) then your most of the way there providing you have belief and passion in the product.

On the flip side of that if you have enough belief and passion about the product or service then the sales comes naturally and you find you are able to answer anything they throw at you off the top of your head.

I've done my time in sales and was never the "hard sell" kind of guy. I hate that and I'm sure most customers do too. Conversational ALWAYS worked the best for me
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Kay
President
President


Joined: 07 Jan 2009
Posts: 3079
Location: Mostly SE Asia
4173 ants

PostPosted: Wed Jul 13, 2011 11:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
If you know your customers and the market and the product inside and out (mainly the customers) then your most of the way there providing you have belief and passion in the product.


Yes, I do - and it certainly helps a heck of a lot to be promoting something that people do want when they get to hear about it.

Quote:
...and you find you are able to answer anything they throw at you off the top of your head.


That is one skill I do have, although it's not necessary when you're communicating by email.

***

I had to do a live interview on radio (for my own business) a few months ago. The whole idea terrified me. I'm a bit phobic about telephones and I don't like public speaking. But one thing I can do is think on my feet. And you have to think fast on a three minute interview on live radio.

Most people said I did OK, one old friend said I sounded like a granny without her teeth in, and I tortured myself for ages afterwards because I didn't like the sound quality (I borrowed a mobile phone to do the interview).
_________________
http://britishexpat.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
planetZest
Executive PA
Executive PA


Joined: 12 Oct 2004
Posts: 51
Location: Reading, UK
58 ants

PostPosted: Fri Sep 02, 2011 6:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree with most of the points made, the hard sell is such a turn off and i could never bring myself to use it on any of my customers. In general I don't acutally do a lot of selling, (ok i avoid it most of the time) but over the years i have had to sell, so i can bring in new projects to work on. Everytime i just simply talk to the customer, show confidence and do not push any angle to alert their SalesDar, most of the time the deal moves forward.

Certainly the same with the cold calling (in regards to emails) i always delete any email that pushes their USP/sales pitch hard without being personal or even being polite.

This thread is good food for thought, as i need to start writing to some business/website owners soon to promote my wifes site and i want to get it right.....first impressions an all on target neiche sites.

I know the percentage for SEO promo mails accepting the cold called offer is supposed to be very low (i have read 5%), but with the right attitude i am sure those figures can be drastically improved.
_________________
Piers
Bespoke Web solutions < (needs updating lol 8 years old)
Personalised Handmade Cards
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
PainFreeProfits
Secretary
Secretary


Joined: 23 Sep 2011
Posts: 13
Location: NC< USA
16 ants

PostPosted: Fri Sep 23, 2011 5:40 pm    Post subject: Being Genuine Reply with quote

All good responses.

I believe sales success comes from approaching the prospect understanding that you are offering value, your expertise, and you're not trying to trick them out of their money somehow.

Also, knowing typical reasons why people choose to do business with you is very important. If you can approach people at companies in similar fields to those you've done work for before, and tell them you've solved problems that are like the ones they are probably experiencing, you'll gain a lot of authority. These reasons will resonate with your prospects and give you the mantle of "trusted advisor" because you clearly understand their business and their problems.

While others are throwing features & benefits against the wall and hoping something sticks, you'll be standing out as a real industry insider.

Any questions on this concept? Hope this helps.

Thanks,
Jason
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    AardvarkBusiness.net Forum Index -> Sales & Marketing Forum All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1

 
Google
 
Business Forum Sport Forum Travel Forum


Powered by php B B © 2001, 2002 php B B Group

AardvarkBusiness.net Business Search Engine & Directory